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An Analysis of Sonnet 130

Iambic Pentameter: The poem makes use of an iambic pentameter, a rhythmic scheme utilized in sonnets. The rhyme scheme is ABABCDCDEFEF GG, and is cut up into three quatrains and a rhyming couplet. It accommodates 10 syllables per line, with syllables alternating between unstressed and careworn when spoken aloud. This offers the sonnet the effect of sounding like a regular love poem, however upon nearer examination of the words used we can tell that the poem and its intentions are utterly completely different.

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The Final Couplet: In Sonnet one hundred thirty, the persona describes the girl with unflattering phrases corresponding to “black wires grow on her head” and “in the breath from that my mistress reeks”.

However, despite the very fact that he factors out her numerous flaws he nonetheless declares his love for her, suggesting that he embraces all her traits and characteristics and loves her nonetheless. This is further exemplified within the final couplet of the poem, “And but, by heaven, I think my love as uncommon; as any she belied with false evaluate.

This sudden distinction, regardless of being contradictory to the earlier lines of the poem, is significant in showing that regardless of her flaws he’s nonetheless wholly in love with her. Throughout the poem, the persona compares his mistress to that of an imaginary, good girl. However, within the last lines we see that the persona chooses the real woman with all her imperfections over the “goddess” he has never seen. Rhyme Alternating rhymes: The rhyme scheme is ABABCDCDEFEF GG. “Sun” rhymes with “dun”, “red” and “head”, and so forth, before ending with “rare” and “compare”.

This enhances the image of a seemingly dull lady that the persona describes – the lady in question is alleged to have breasts that are dun, suggesting that she is sexually unattractive. Her lips are contrasted with that of coral, “Coral much more red than her lips’ red”. Red is the colour of sensuality, and thus the persona is stating that she isn’t a sensual girl. The impact that this rhyming scheme gives is to distinction the persona’s definition of magnificence as part of nature and the woman’s flaws.

Third Quatrain and Final Couplet: The persona declares that he would “love to hear her speak”, regardless of her voice being less stunning than music. This is the first time within the poem that reward has been conferred upon the persona’s mistress. He then goes on to match the lady with that of a goddess, the very best being and his imperfect mistress. The last lines introduce a change within the rhyming scheme, with a couplet ending the rhythmic three quatrains.

The couplet is used to introduce a new idea, that despite the woman’s flaws, the persona ‘s love for her is larger than that of the heavens. This highlights a key theme of the poem – whatever the woman’s physical flaws and looks, the persona is prepared to see previous her looks and still be beautiful in his eyes. This is critical because within the Shakespearean Era, the position of women was to please man with an attractive face and body, and right here we see Shakespeare expressing his love for a girl who didn’t possess many of those qualities.

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