Author Exploration Paper on Writer”s Biography

Born on December eighteenth, 1870, Hector Hugh Munro was the third child of Charles Augustus Munro, an inspector general in the Burma police. H.H. Munro’s mother, Mary Frances Mercer, was killed a mere two years after her youngest son was born. She was killed by a runaway cow in England (Merriman). After her death, H.H. Munro and his siblings were raised in England by their two aunts and grandmother. These three adults had been typically the inspiration for lots of female characters in Munro’s stories (“A biography of Saki”).

Mrs. DeRopp, in “Srendi Vashtar”, is modelled after his aunt Agnes (“H.H. Munro: About the Author”). His aunts were each very strict, they usually often used the birch and whip as a form of punishment. However, if Saki had not faced such harsh trials as a child, his future works won’t have been as rich as they’re today{Subjunctive mode}.

Due to the Munro children’s poor health, they have been pressured to be taught by governesses at residence.

At the age of twelve, H.H. Munro was finally able to attend college in Exmouth and Bedford Grammar. H.H. Munro’s father retired when Hector was sixteen. For a couple of years, the small family traveled the continent before his father organized a submit for him in the Burma police. Munro spent 13 months in Burma. Although sick on multiple events, Munro was able to research Burmese animals, and he even raised a tiger cub throughout his time there(A Biography of Saki”).

In 1984, Munro was compelled to return to England after contracting malaria whereas in Burma.In 1896, Munro begn to put in writing political satires for the Westminster Gazette. These essays had been later collected and published as The Westminster Alice.

In 1902, Munro printed a group of his quick stories, called Not-So Stories. Munro also revealed only one work of great non-fiction referred to as The Rise of the Russian Empire. This was the only piece ever written by Munro to include his real name on the guide jacket. For all of Munro’s different items, nonetheless, Munro’s name was nowhere to be found. Instead, Munro selected to write underneath the pen name of “Saki”. The name Saki can imply certainly one of two issues, either Munro was referring to himself as a breed of monkey, or he noticed himself because the cupbearer of Fitzgerald’s Rubaiyat. It is extra probable that the latter option is true, for Saki had usually expressed his admiration for Fitzgerald’s work (Hitchens){Compound sentence}.

During his lifetime, Saki additionally served as a war correspondent earlier than moving to Paris to write for The Morning Post and a French paper. He briefly revisited England in 1907 when his father became sick and died in May. Saki then opened a membership, The Cocoa Tree, and continued to write down for so much of newspapers and publish his brief stories. When struggle was declared in late 1914, Saki enlisted in the army though he was formally too old{Complex Sentence}. He additionally surprised a lot of his admirers by turning down a number of commissions and insisting that he serve in the trenches, claiming that he couldn’t lead troopers if he didn’t first know tips on how to be one (Hitchens). He continued writing{gerund phrase} whereas in the army about his life on the entrance until November in 1916.

Near the village of Beaumont-Home on the river Somes, Saki was shot by a German sniper. On the verge of a crater, the good storyteller shouted, “Put that bloody cigarette out!” Those were to be the “great Saki’s” final words (Hitchens). Although Saki’s hand would write no more, it is quite clear that Saki’s writing has positively been influenced by his life events. H.H. Munro, or Saki, lived and wrote in the course of the late 1800s and early 1900s. This time period was speckled with various wars and revolutions, and gave start to the world’s first great war. Throughout these main events, Saki was there to witness, document, and ultimately give his life to these skirmishes.

During his life, Saki traveled to the Balkans, Russia, Poland, and France as a foreign correspondent from 1902 to 1908. While in these countries, he witnessed “Bloody Sunday” in St.Petersburg and the Russian Revolution of 1905. He additionally criticized the government for its “inept handling” of the Boer War (Silet). Saki’s many travels allowed him to be uncovered to hardships and dangers that “…did a lot to alter the tone of his work” (Silet). Saki’s travels to Europe also “…introduced him to European Folk Literature” (Silet), a genre that supplied him with both subject material and the darker imaginative and prescient of many of his later fiction.

When not traveling the world, Saki was often found in England, the place he made observations concerning the Edwardian society that he lived in. He later transformed these observations into many brief stories, based mostly on the upsetting of the monotonous routine of on a daily basis life (Silet). However, in course of the end of his life, Saki’s work is darker; there seems to be less humor in his writing as time goes on (Silet).

During this period of his life, a touch of naturalism begins to creep into his writing, almost extinguishing the flickering tongue of humor that was evident in all of his work. Saki’s use of naturalism is very obvious in his later fiction, such as the short stories “Dogged” and “The remoulding of Groby Lingfoughn”(Elahipanah). Although Saki wrote many alternative tales, sometimes utilizing multiple genres, there is no question that the various world events that occurred during Saki’s lifetime greatly influenced Saki’s writing. Saki has usually been called a “master of the short story”(Hitchens). Aside from this title, Saki was also a grasp of satire. Satire is usually witty and ironic, and makes use of fastidiously hidden hints within the text to convey its message.

The style not often attacks specific people, and sometimes makes use of extremes to convey the audience to an consciousness of the danger in a selected society (“Characteristics of Satire”). More specifically, Saki was an Edwardian satirist–he usually made enjoyable of his society, and lots of of his brief stories need to deal with terribly strange events taking place to the ordinary individuals of his social class and time interval (“H.H. Munro: About the Author”). Saki’s earlier stories are usually extra humorous; his later tales are darker and extra macabre due to his many experiences with warfare and the darker sides of humanity (Silet). Naturalism, a genre that exhibits the harsher aspect of life and portrays the concept man is powerless against nature{appositive phrase}, is also apparent in some of Saki’s aforementioned later fiction. Many figures from Saki’s childhood (mainly his aunts Agatha and Charlotte) are also used as models for many of Saki’s female characters (Silet).

The traits of satire and and naturalism are both clearly portrayed through Saki’s writing. Saki’s short story “On Approval” consists of lots of the basic traits of satire that are additionally present in Saki’s different works. Having lived in England for a lot of his life, Saki knew the the city properly, and selected London, a city he typically frequented, as the setting for this story (“A Biography of Saki”). Gebhard Knopfschrank, a self-pronounced artist, strikes to London from his small farm to attempt his success at painting. As time goes on, Knopfschrank becomes increasingly poor, hardly ever buying meals. However, one day, Knopfschrank enters his boarding home and gleefully buys “…an elaborate meal that scarcely stopped short of being a banquet.” (“On Approval”).

The other boarders, believing that Knopfschrank has finally offered his his art and been found as a genius, rush to buy Knopfschrank’s ridiculously costly work, eager to purchase his work{infinitive phrase} earlier than their costs increase together with his fame. Later, the boarders understand that Knopfschrank has not bought a single portray in any respect. In reality, a wealthy American has accidentally hit, and killed, many animals again on Knopfschrank’s farm. The American hastily paid “‘…perhaps more than they were value, many occasions more than they’d have fetched out there after a month of fattening, but he was in a hurry to get on to Dantzig.’” (“On Approval”). Saki’s use of satire in this piece is obvious. At the end of the story, Saki, by way of Knopfschrank’s character, ridicules Americans and the way they constantly rush around utilizing money to get out of their problems, saying, “‘…God be thanked for wealthy Americans, who are at all times in a hurry to get someplace else” (“On Approval”).

This basic attack on a specific group of people is a component generally used in satire (“Characteristics of Satire”). This story also makes use of satire in one other way–it may be very ironic. Irony is almost always present in satire “(Characteristics of Satire”). On the final evening of his keep, Knopfschrank sells many of his works, noting “Till to- day I have bought not one of my sketches. To-night you have bought a couple of, because I am going away from you” (“On Approval”). This is an instance of situational irony. Satire is also evident one more method in this piece–Saki writes the story in such a way that he makes the members of the boarding house’s unlucky mistake seem more humorous than tragic, which is a key point of satire (“Characteristics of Satire”). Saki also states in the textual content that Knopfschrank “…fancied he may paint and was pardonably anxious to flee from the monotony of rye bread food regimen and the sandy, swine-bestrewn plains of Pomerania” (“On Approval”).

This quote portrays a standard theme that usually seems in a lot of Saki’s writings–the upsetting of everyday routines. The use of Saki’s style satire and his personal connections to the setting of the story are evident Saki’s “On Approval”. Saki’s short story “The Interlopers” has clearly been influenced by Saki’s own life and genre. This tale, which takes place in a small strip of disputed forest, is about two enemies–Ulrich von Gradwitz and Georg Znaeym–who are both out late on a stormy evening, patrolling their borders with their huntsmen, every making an attempt to catch and kill the other. After wandering for a while, the men come nose to nose with each other. Before either can react, however, there was a “…splitting crash over their heads” (“The Interlopers”) and a towering tree {participial phrase[present]} falls and pins each males to the ground.

The two talk for a time, at first buying and selling insults, however their exchanges soon turn out to be a lot kinder as the men start to supply one another their friendship. By the top of the story, the previous enemies have now become associates, and they see dark figures rushing towards them. Believing these figures to be their males, coming to rescue them, the 2 feel that all of their troubles are over, earlier than coming to the startling realization that the varieties, presumed to be their saviors, are literally the issues that might be their deaths–wolves. The story ends with Ulrich letting out “…the idiotic chattering of a man unstrung with worry.” (“The Interlopers”).

This story incorporates many examples of irony, which is each a staple of satire (“Characteristics of Satire”) and a common component in lots of Saki’s different stories. Dramatic irony is proven in the midst of the story, when the 2 enemies, preventing over a chunk of land, are ultimately killed by that land. Irony is portrayed in the story yet once more by having the 2 former enemies finish a century-long household feud mere moments earlier than their own demise. Saki even states within the text that “…if there was a man on the earth whom [Gradwitz] detested and wished unwell to it was Georg Znaeym” (“The Interlopers”). This story also connects to Saki’s private life via the story’s setting. This story takes place in a forest positioned “…somewhere on the japanese spurs of the Carpathians” (“The Interlopers”), an space that Saki visited while touring along with his family (Merriaman). Saki’s “The Interlopers” consists of features of Saki’s life, style, and environment in its telling.

Many totally different sides of Saki’s life and his satire can be present in his brief story “The Lumber-Room”. In this story, a young boy, Nicholas, is banned from the garden and forced to stay at home with his unpleasant aunt as punishment whereas his cousins are taken to the seaside for a trip. While at house, Nicholas manages to pull off an excellent trick on his aunt; he compels her to imagine that he is within the forbidden backyard whereas Nicholas steals the important thing to the mysterious lumber-room. Once contained in the mysterious room, Nicholas explores the room, discovering dozens of prizes. While in this room, Nicholas hears his aunt calling and swiftly runs to her, only to discover that she has fallen into the water tank in the forbidden garden and is trapped inside, calling for assist. Nicholas then explains to his aunt, whom he believes to be “…the Evil One” (“The Lumber-Room”), that he can not assist her because, as a result of rules laid out by her, he’s not allowed to enter the garden.

Nicholas leaves the aunt within the water tank till a maid discovers her. Meanwhile, the opposite aunt and the youngsters return from their go to, which turned out to be disastrous. While sitting at dinner, Nicholas displays on the tapestry that he saw, and speculates that the huntsman should still escape from the wolves along with his hounds. This story shows many different elements of Saki’s own childhood. Saki himself was really raised by his two aunts.

Saki, like Nicholas, also despised two aunts, and infrequently based a lot of his female characters off of them (Hitchens). Saki was a practical joker (“A Biography of Saki”), fairly just like Nicholas in the story. Saki was additionally very keen on animals throughout his lifetime (“H.H. Munro: About the Author”), and displays this love of animals in “The Lumber-Room” by scattering lots of them all through the story. Nicholas finds some of these animals in the lumber room; there are lots of animal-themed objects, and Nicholas soon discovers brass figures formed in the images of “…hump-necked bulls, and peacocks and goblins” (“The Lumber-Room”).

There can also be a wonderful guide depicting colourful birds. Saki exhibits his love of animals by putting them in this “…storehouse of unimagined treasures” (“The Lumber-Room”). Saki uses irony, an important element of satire, in this story as nicely. When Nicholas’s aunt is trapped in the water tank and wishes Nicholas to save lots of her, Nicholas is unable to as a result of she dictated earlier that he was “…not to enter the gooseberry garden” (“The Lumber-Room”). Saki uses each satire and his own life experiences to give this story true life and shade.

The events of Saki’s life are closely apparent in his short story “Sredni Vashtar”. In this story, Conradin, a younger boy{appositive phrase}, is pressured by his sickness to stay with his despised cousin, Mrs. DeRopp. One day, however, Conradin is prepared to smuggle an internecine ferret into the shed by his room. Conradin names this ferret Sredni Vashtar and creates a religion round this feral god. His aunt soon grows suspicious as Conradin begins to spend all of his time within the shed, exhibiting fervid devotion to the gracile ferret. As time goes on, Conradin grows increasingly more obsessed with the ferret, and begins to chant “‘Do one factor for me, Sredni Vashtar.’” (“Sredni Vashtar”). Finally, his aunt goes to investigate the shed, puzzled as to why Conradin finds it so interesting. During her visit to the shed, a scream is heard coming from it. Moments later, a sleek shadow darts off into the night, its maw purple and darkish with Mrs. DeRopp’s blood. This story displays Saki’s personal childhood in many ways.

Saki, like Conradin, was weak when he was young, and was not deemed healthy sufficient to attend faculty till the age of twelve (Hitchens). Conradin also feels that “…without his imagination” (Sredni Vashtar”) he would not have been capable of stay due to”…drawn-out dullness” (“Sredni Vashtar). Saki writes that he typically felt the identical way (Silet). Saki, like Conradin, was additionally confined to the care of an overbearing relative whom he greatly disliked–his aunt, Agatha (Silet). In “Sredni Vashtar, Conradin hates Mrs. DeRopp with “…a desperate sincerity which he was perfectly capable of masks.” (“Sredni Vashtar”). Saki most probably felt this identical means in direction of his own aunts. Mrs. DeRopp is definitely based mostly off of Saki’s despised aunt (Silet).

Clearly, many references to Saki’s early childhood are made in Saki’s “Sredni Vashtar”. Saki’s brief stories, which are often about extraordinary issues happening to extra-ordinary individuals, are as relevant in today’s world as they have been throughout Saki’s own lifetime. Many of Saki’s works make the most of the important thing aspects of each satire and naturalism, completely. Saki uses ironic wit and exaggerated situations to enthrall the reader in his works. This same technique is usually present in political cartoons today. Saki has also used his considerable abilities to affect different authors, similar to P.G. Wodehouse. One well-known actor (Hitchens) that was closely impressed by Saki’s work was the late Noël Coward (Hitchens). While staying at a county home, Coward discovered a duplicate of Beasts and Super Beasts (a collection of Saki’s quick stories) and was captivated by the author’s work (Hitchens). “‘I took it up to my bed room, opened it casually, and was unable to fall asleep until I had finished it’” (Hitchens).

When referring to his own writing, Saki often referred to as it ‘“true sufficient to be fascinating but not true sufficient to be tiresome’” (Hitchens). This view of Saki’s prose is type of clear–although his work primarily focuses on the folks of Saki’s day, the large events that occur to them maintain Saki’s work attention-grabbing and interesting. There is no doubt that Saki was in a position to create imaginative works that captivate the reader, lovely short stories which may be extremely detailed, and unique texts which would possibly be unlike another author’s{Parallel construction}. This makes Saki’s tales attention-grabbing and fun to learn.Saki’s work has definitely been influenced by his private experiences, his environment, and the genre of satire. Saki’s ironic quick tales divulge to his readers his private view on the disturbance of day by day routine, events that also happen quite often today.

August WilsonAfrican American author August Wilson received a Pulitzer Prize and a

August WilsonAfrican American author August Wilson gained a Pulitzer Prize and a Tony Grant for his play Fences and earned a second Pulitzer Prize for The Piano Exercise.

August Wilson was conceived on April 27, 1945, His mother, Daisy Wilson, was of African American legacy. His dad was a German foreigner named Frederick Kittel in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Kriszen & Mandell 2017). He composed his first play, Jitney, in 1979. Fences earned him a Pulitzer Prize and a Tony Grant in 1987. Wilson received one other Pulitzer Prize in 1990, for The Piano Exercise. In 1996, Seven Guitars debuted on the Broadway arrange, trailed by King Hedley II in 2001 and Jewel of the Sea in 2004. He died after a longtime battle with cancer on October 2, 2005, in Seattle, At the point when his people separated, he, his mother and his kin moved from the poor Bedford Road territory of Pittsburgh to the commonly white neighborhood of Oakland. His new play, Radio Golf, had opened in Los Angeles, California, only a couple of months sooner (Martin & Downing 2014).

Gem of the Ocean’ Set in 1904, a youthful African American named Citizen Barlow, in the same way as other others voyaging north in the years after the Common War touches base in Pittsburgh on the lookout for reason, flourishing, and reclamation. A woman named Auntie Ester, who is reputed to be 285 years of age and have recuperating powers, chooses to assist the young fellow on his life’s voyage (Gantt 2009). ‘Joe Turner’s Come and Gone’ The title warrants a touch of verifiable setting; Joe Turner was the name of a manor proprietor who, whatever the liberation declaration, constrained African Americans to work in his fields.

Conversely, Seth and Bertha Holly’s motel provides room and sustenance to wayward spirits who’ve been abused, manhandled, and infrequently even captured by individuals from white society. The play occurs in the 12 months 1911(Gantt 2009). ‘Mama Rainey’s Black Bottom’As four African American blues performers hold tight for Mama Rainey, the renowned lead artist of their band, they commerce with none preparation jokes and front-line points. At the point when the blues diva arrives, the strains keep on mounting, pushing the gathering in path of its limit. The tone is a mix of harshness, giggling, and the blues, a perfect portrayal of the dark experience amid the late Twenties (Gantt 2009). ‘The Piano Lesson’ A piano that has been passed on for ages turns into the wellspring of competition for people from the Charles family. Set in 1936, the storyline mirrors the significance of articles in relationship to the previous. This play collected August Wilson his second Pulitzer Prize (Gantt 2009). ‘Seven Guitars’ Addressing the topic of music certainly, this dramatization begins with the demise of guitarist Floyd Barton in 1948. At that time, the story actions to the previous, and the group of onlookers observes the hero in his younger days, eventually paving the way to his finish (Gantt 2009). ‘Fences’ Maybe Wilson’s most prestigious work, Wall investigates the life and connections of Troy Maxson, a dissident disapproved of waste gatherer, and former baseball legend. The hero speaks to the battle for fairness and reasonable therapy amid the Nineteen Fifties. This transferring show earned Wilson his first Pulitzer Prize. ‘Two Trains Running’ This quite a few honor successful dramatization is ready in Pittsburgh 1969, in the tallness of the struggle for social equality. Disregarding the political and social change that clears via the nation, a substantial lot of the characters of this play are excessively skeptical, too downtrodden to encounter trust later or rage for the continual disasters (Gantt 2009). ‘Jitney’ Set in a taxi driver’s station amid the uproarious late Nineteen Seventies, this character-driven play consists of sharp-witted, hustling associates who tattle, contend, and dream in the center of occupations (Gantt 2009). ‘King Hedley II’ Regularly regarded as the bitterest and most disastrous of Wilson’s cycle, the play centers around the wreck of the prideful ex-con hero, Ruler Hedley II (the youngster of one of many characters from Seven Guitars) (Gantt 2009). The mid-1980s setting discovers Wilson’s cherished Slopes Locale in an inauspicious, neediness-stricken neighborhood. ‘Radio Golf’ With this 1990s setting, the final play within the cycle recounts to the narrative of well-to-do Harmond Wilks, an efficient legislator and land engineer who considers tearing down a notable old home that when had a spot with none aside from Auntie Ester. Everything finally ends up at ground zero (Gantt 2009).In his Pulitzer Prize-winning dramatization Fences 1987, notwithstanding, August Wilson utilizes each the history and folklore of baseball to problem the legitimacy of the American dream. Set in 1957, simply earlier than the beginning of the social equality growth. Fences takes place when sorted out baseball has at lengthy last progressed towards becoming interwound, but when racial separation remains widespread. ridded, the hero, Troy Maxon a previous Negro Association slugger is overwhelmed by harshness, persuaded that if you are a dark man in America, “you bom with two strikes on you beforehand you go to the plate”. All through the play Wilson places Troy inside the authentic setting of the Negro Alliances, allowing his character to resound the feelings of real dark ballplayers who had been denied an opportunity to contend on the significant class stage. Besides, by arranging Troy inside three of baseball’s mythic settings the backyard, the fight zone, and the memorial park or however sacrosanct space Wilson negates the possibility of America as a “fielIn Fences the national leisure exercise is recolored by bigotry, the country’s Edenic guarantee is illusory, and the standard folklore of baseball is counter progressive. In ‘Fences” Wilson, takes advantage of a past crammed with darkish baseball that started in America in the decades following the Common War and continued in numerous buildings until 1947, when Jackie Robinson eventually crossed baseball’s shading line, proprietor for over 60 years that no blacks might play in baseball(Koprince 2006).

Analysis of The Telegram a short story by author Iain Crichton Smith

‘The Telegram’ is a brief story by author Iain Crichton Smith. The story follows two women’s experiences because the destiny of their sons. The writer makes use of character and setting to extend the reader’s enjoyment of the story. Through using setting in terms of time and place the writer will increase the reader’s enjoyment of the story. The story is set in a Scottish costal island in the course of the Second World War. The two girls live in a one street village and war is alien to them.

Not just the ladies however the whole village does not understand the aim of the warfare:

“It came as a wierd plague.”

The village of the ladies was a really shut knit community and this meant that everyone knew all people else. To the village people the struggle was an assault on them quite than the nation because the war was killing their young men they usually felt that it was not their warfare to be part of.

The Telegram itself had an impact on the village because it felt like ‘a unusual missile’ because it might only trigger havoc and destruction amongst the village folks and most significantly wreck their lives. The setting of the story is effectively used by the writer to affect or have an effect on the characters, this use of setting increases the reader’s enjoyment of the story. Crichton Smith description is principally focused on the thin ladies, the author makes use of the imagery of a bird:

“ The other extra aquiline, extra gaunt, or to be more precise, more like a buzzard.

The thin girls is perceived to be a person who isn’t very pleasant. The thin women has had a really hard life to deal with and because of this she is very unbiased. Through the imagery of a buzzard, a chook of prey, the skinny women gives the impression that she is healthier than everybody else and like a buzzard she is stronger too. The use of the buzzard can be significant as a outcome of the story is ready in Scotland and the buzzard is Scotland’s most common chook of prey. However, although the thin women is portrayed in a bad means, the skinny ladies has been pressured to make plenty of sacrifices. The skinny girls solely obtained ten shillings in pension was compelled into not buying new clothes. The realisation of the cruel circumstances that the thin girls has confronted make the reader benefit from the story more as a result of the reader has sympathy for the skinny girls and figuring out that her son is not dead gives the skinny girls hope.

Despite all the sacrifices , the skinny ladies saved and saved till she might send her son to college. This is a purpose why the thin girls thought she was better than everyone as a outcome of others might afford to ship their youngsters to school however chose not because they thought of it as snobbish . The incontrovertible truth that the villagers thought schooling is snobby gives the reader perception into society the ladies lived in, the society that would not ship their kids to college in case that someone spoke sick of them. To cope with the hardships, the skinny women has had to develop lots of discipline and self-control to survive.

The hardships the women has confronted have left her to level out no emotions and sympathy in the direction of anybody however herself. However, for a second the thin girls tries to comfort the fats ladies in her time of want, this modification in character is unusual as a end result of the thin ladies does not count on sympathy from others but now she is sympathetic in the direction of another person. Iain Crichton Smith makes use of the setting to indicate how it influences or has an impression on the characters, this use of setting will increase the reader’s enjoyment of the story. Like the skinny women, the writer uses the imagery of a chook to explain the ladies:

“…a fat home bird…”

The fats women is described like ‘a fats domestic’ this implies that the fat women could be very dependant on others in contrast to the thin ladies. The word fat’ gives the reader the concept the fats women has had it all in her life. Through the writers use of home bird’ it is advised that the fat girls. Due to the different lives each girls lived they have differing views on things, this causes arguments between them:

“ Well, I just thought they’re better off.’ stated the fats women in a confused tone, ‘ they get better meals they usually get better conditions.’ “

The fat women is jealous how the skinny women’s son is best off than her son although the skinny women is poorer e.g. the skinny women’s son is of higher rank and gets better pay than the fats women’s son. The author provides perception into the fat ladies when she explains why she didn’t risk sending her son to university in case others thought she was snobbish. Despite not sending her son to university it’s evident that the fat girls loves her son unconditionally, in distinction to the skinny women, the fats ladies does not anticipate compensation from her son for bringing him up, this make the fat women a likeable character thus growing the reader’s enjoyment of the story.

When the fats women is aware of that the elder isn’t coming to her house she is all excited however then she realizes that it could be the thin women’s son who has died and solely then does the fat ladies realise what the thin has gone by way of and tries to sympathy but she cannot. The causes for the fats ladies exhibiting no sympathy are that firstly, she doesn’t like the thin girls and since the considered losing her personal son has emotionally drained the thin women. The setting adds to suspense and pressure all through the story and particularly the climax. From the skinny women’s window they can see the complete village:

“ As the watched they might see on the far finish of the road the tall man in black clothes carrying in his hand a bit of yellow paper. This was a naked village with little colour subsequently the yellow was both strange and unnatural.”

The proven reality that the women might see the person at the finish of the village from the skinny women’s window emphasise to the reader how small the village is, the village being small suggests that it is a very shut knit neighborhood. The village consists of one road and as a outcome of the elder walks along the road the suspense and pressure builds and the reader expects the elder to visit the houses of the women nevertheless this doesn’t occur. In the end the reader is shocked how it is really the elder’s son who has died and the suspense and tension that results in this increases the impact. In conclusion, Iain Crichton Smith efficiently makes use of setting, character, imagery as properly suspense and rigidity to extend the readers enjoyment of the story.

Analyse how the author develops a big concept or theme in Macbeth

Guilt is a state of mind by which an individual or group of people experiences battle at having accomplished one thing that one believes one shouldn’t have accomplished. In excessive instances of guilt, the feeling won’t go away easily and if it is ignored it might cause folks to develop mental diseases similar to melancholy. In William Shakespeare’s play Macbeth, the idea that guilt can’t be ignored is explored through the primary characters, Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. Shakespeare explores this idea by way of the utilization of symbolism, character improvement and non secular references throughout the play as Macbeth and Lady Macbeth do their finest to disregard their responsible conscience after planning and committing the murder of the Scottish king, King Duncan, and the next murders that adopted this in order to keep Macbeth on the throne.

Immediately after Macbeth had killed King Duncan his guilt was obvious, though Lady Macbeth’s guilt was not proven until later within the play. When their guilt had lastly been acknowledged, neither one of them was prepared to take accountability for his or her actions and so the guilt continued to eat away at every of them, leading to devastating penalties for each of them.

Perhaps the most obvious technique used by Shakespeare to precise the concept guilt cannot be ignored was Symbolism. Shakespeare constantly employed this method all through the play by way of his reference to blood as a symbol of characters guilt, “Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood clean from my hand? No this my hand will quite the multitudinous seas incarnadine making the green one pink.

” (Act 2, Scene 2). This comment made by Macbeth as he looked as his blood-stained arms instantly after he had “done the deed” and murdered Duncan, confirmed that he had realized the enormity of what he had just done and that he was immediately regretful and not sure if he would ever be ready to forgive himself for what he had done. Shakespeare also used blood as a symbol to level out Lady Macbeth’s guilt as in act 5 scene 1 she mentioned “Here’s the odor of blood nonetheless; all the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand” and he or she eventually killed herself after being unable to do away with an imaginary spot of blood on her hand, “Out, damned spot! Out i say!”

At the start of the play, Lady Macbeth was introduced to the viewers as merciless and impressive and gave the impression to be with out remorse or remorse at the murder that she had initiated. Her character development all through the play was utilized by Shakespeare to bolster the concept guilt can’t be ignored as her character went from feeling no guilt about Duncan’s homicide, to feeling so responsible that she ended up killing herself. When Macbeth expressed his immediate regret at killing Duncan, “this is a sorry sight” (Act 2 scene 2), Lady Macbeth replied by telling Macbeth not too think a lot about what he had carried out “My palms are of your color, but I disgrace to put on a heart so white.” (Act 2 scene 2). This cool reaction to Macbeth’s humanity began to disintegrate as the play continued, and by the end of the play, Lady Macbeth felt so guilty about creating the monster that Macbeth turned that she began expressing this guilt subconsciously as she slept “The Thane of Fife had a wife. Where is she now? What will these arms ne’er be clean?” this response shows how much her character had developed as it was distinction to Lady Macbeth earlier saying that a little water would clear her and Macbeth of this deed.

Through reference to religion, Shakespeare was additionally capable of develop the idea that you cannot ignore guilt. The belief in God was extremely important throughout Shakespearian instances and it was believed that a king was God’s representative on earth. When Macbeth thought-about murdering Duncan in Act 1, he felt guilty at even excited about committing this sin “as his host who ought to towards his murderer shut the door, not bear the knife myself. Besides, this Duncan hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been so clear in his great office, that his virtues will plead like angels, trumpet-toung’d against the deep damnation of his taking-off. “and he thought that if he murdered Duncan then there would be outrage in heaven. After murdering Duncan, Macbeth realized he had violated what God needed, and he felt so responsible about this that he was unable to say amen “I couldn’t say ‘Amen’ once they did say ‘God bless us.’”

Throughout Macbeth, Shakespeare explored the theme that guilt cannot be ignored without resulting in devastating consequences. Shakespeare was successfully in a place to trigger me to agree with this idea through the use of symbolism, character development and non secular references throughout the play as Macbeth and Lady Macbeth’s guilt over the deeds that they had committed resulted in devastating penalties for every of them.

“fifth grade autobiography” and “the author”

Both Dove’s and Wilbur’s poems are written from the perspective of an older writer trying back at youth. Although in “5th Grade Autobiography” the writer writes of her own youth from a first person perspective whereas the in “The Writer” the creator writes about his daughter’s youth from an outside perspective, both splendidly impart the blissful feeling of childhood via vivid descriptions of the gentle and nice nuances that make childhood so blissful.

Rita Dove shows us her world via the lens of a fifth grader.

She envies her older brother although he is depicted as younger and inexperienced, shown by his poor option to squat in poison ivy. Her grandparents have a really robust presence and are given simply as vigorous a role as her younger brother. Pictures of luminous felines come to thoughts when she describes her grandmother, a youthful and vibrant staple in her world. Grandfather smells of lemons, a brilliant, zesty, energetic scent, and is imprinted in her life reminiscences of Christmases.

Richard Wilber manages to conjure a similarly blissful/childish world encompassed by the sounds of a typewriter, stunning linden home windows, and the majestic and dreamlike positioning of his daughters room. He pulls us additional into this blissful phantasm through the use of phrases and descriptions alluding to a ship, drifting into the deep open water away from the relaxation of the world. After bringing us into the peaceful settings of a child’s world, each authors ship us plummeting into deep thought.

Dove does so by abruptly letting us knowthat this grandfather is not alive but his reminiscence or “hands” nonetheless exist in our minds as it did when it was written in this fifth grader’s autobiography. What does this say about her grandfather’s existence and death? Perhaps that recording it via a photograph and even the writing of a fifth grader, it has turn into everlasting. This pushes us to consider the sheer energy of writing our thoughts and experiences down on paper.

Richard also makes us consider the energy and power that writing has even for youth. The setting of his daughter’s writing turns into the jail trapping the fragile starling. The heart-wrenching wrestle of the songbird to free itself from the confines of the room, smashing its delicate physique against the window until it lastly slips free, it equated to the daughters struggle to get her phrases on the web page.

The younger author continuously pauses her finger-smashing to gather herself and proceed on in her writing, similar to the chook repetitively selecting up and making an attempt once more to seek out freedom. The humped and bloody fowl is seen as his daughter, fighting with all its life pressure to free itself from the constraints we people feel as writers till we finally break away, the identical struggle his daughter faced in that very room.

Essay from filipino author

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease cookie sheets. 3. In a medium bowl, cream the shortening and sugar until smooth. Add the egg, and vanilla; mix until fluffy. Stir in the pumpkin. Sift together the flour, baking soda, salt, pumpkin pie spice, and cinnamon; stir into the pumpkin mixture. Finally, stir in the raisins and walnuts. 4. Drop cookie dough by heaping spoonful onto the prepared cookie sheets. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes in the preheated oven, cookies should be light brown around the edges. Brush with the spice glaze, and transfer to racks to cool. 5. To make the spice glaze, mix confectioners’ sugar with 2 tablespoons of warm water until there are no more lumps. Stir in the 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon. If the glaze is too thick, add a little more water.

Oatmeal Raisins Cookies
Ingredients

3 eggs, beaten
1 cup raisins
1 cup packed brown sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup butter
1 cup white sugar
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 cup chopped pecans
2cupsrolledoats

Procedures
1. Combine eggs, vanilla and raisins in a small bowl; cover and let stand for 1 hour. 2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). 3. In a large bowl, cream the butter, brown sugar, and white sugar together. Sift together the flour, cinnamon, and baking soda; stir into the creamed mixture. Then stir in the raisin mixture, rolled oats, and nuts. 4. Drop by teaspoonful’s onto an unprepared cookie sheet. Bake for 10 minutes, or until lightly browned.

Papaya Cookies
Ingredients
3 cups All-purpose flour
1/8 teaspoon salt
½ cups Papaya ripe
2 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup butter
1 egg
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
Procedures
1. Pre-heat oven at 40F.
2. Put 1 cup butter in mixing bowl and cream until fluffy.
3. Add sugar and egg. Beat well until well-blended.
4. Add vanilla, flour and salt.
5. Beat thoroughly until smooth.
6. Drop or mold the mixture and arrange on a well-greased baking sheet. 7. Bake for 10 to 15 mins. Or until golden brown.

Coconut Drops
Ingredients
1 cup margarine
2 cups brown sugar, packed
2 eggs, beaten
½ cup milk
3 ½ cup flour
½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon nbaking powdert
1 cup shredded coconut

Procedures
1. Cream margarine, sugar and eggs.
2. Add milk, coconut, then sifted dry ingredients. Drop by teaspoonfuls on slightly greased cookie sheet, some distance apart. 3. Bake in moderately hot oven.

Banana Oatmeal Cookies
Ingredients
1 ½ cup flour ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup sugar 1 cup mashed ripe bananas ½ teaspoon baking soda 1 egg
½ cup chopped nuts ½ teaspoon cinnamon 1 ¼ cup rolled nuts ¾ cup shortening

Procedures
1. Cream shortening and sugar; add egg and beat until fluffy. 2. Add bananas, nuts and oats.
3. Add sifted dry ingredients and blend.
4. Drop by teaspoonfuls some inches apart on ungreased cookie sheets. Bake in hot oven. Remove the baked cookies from pan at once.

Peanut Beatles
Ingredients
2 eggs 2 cups flour
2/3 cup oil 2 teaspoon baking powder 2/4 cup sugar ½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon vanilla roasted peanuts

Procedures
1. Beat eggs until light and foamy; add oil, little by little, vanilla and sugar, beating continually. 2. Sift together dry ingredients and add to first mixture.
3. Drop by teaspoonfuls, some distance apart, on cookie sheet lined with wax paper. 4. Press a peanut in the middle of each cookie, sprinkle with brown sugar 5. Bake in hot oven.

Pineapple Cookies
Ingredients
2/3 cup margarine 4 tablespoon pineapple jam 1 cup sugar 2 ½ cup sifted flour 1 egg, beaten 1 teaspoon baking soda

Procedures
1. Cream margarine, add sugar gradually, creaming until fluffy. 2. Add egg, jam, and sifted dry ingredients.
3. Drop by teaspoonfuls some inches apart on ungreased baking pan. Bake in moderate oven until golden. 4. Top cookies with bits of pineapple jam and serve.

“Cakes”

Orange Blossom Cake
Ingredients
1 cup margarine ½ teaspoon salt 1 ½ cup sugar 4 teaspoon baking powder 3 eggs 2/3 cup orange juice & water 3 cup sifted cake flour Grated Orange Rind

Procedures
1. Cream shortening and sugar until light and fluffy.
2. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. 3. Add orange rind. Sift together dry ingredients and all alternately with liquid to creamed mixture. Pour into greased cake pan. Bake in a moderate oven.

Pineapple Up Side down
Topping:
1 firmly pack brown sugar
½ cup butter
1 can Pineapple slices

Cake:
1 ½ cup all-purpose flour 1 ¾ cup refined sugar 6 tablespoon cake flour 1 cup butter 6 tablespoon ground almonds 4 large egg 1 teaspoon baking powder ¾ vanilla extract ¾ cup Sour milk

Procedures
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Adjust the position of the rack to the center of the oven. Grease and flour 2 (9-inch) pans or 3 (8-inch) pans. Set aside. 2. In a large bowl, stir together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, and granulated sugar. Set aside. In the bowl of a mixer, cream margarine and brown sugar on low speed, and then increase speed to medium and beat until well-combined. Gradually add the dry ingredients and beat on low speed until just incorporated. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each egg and scraping down the sides of the bowl after the addition of each egg.

Add vanilla, sweet potatoes, pineapple, raisins, and walnuts and blend on low speed until thoroughly mixed. 3. Pour batter into pans and smooth the surface with a metal spatula. Bake for 1 hour to 1 hour and 10 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean; when you touch the center of the cake, it should spring back. Allow to cool in pans for 10 minutes, and then invert onto a rack and cool completely.

4. For icing: In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat cream cheese and butter on medium speed until smooth. Add vanilla and beat until incorporated. Gradually add sugar and beat on low speed until smooth. Icing the cake: Place 1 cake layer, top-side down, on a cake platter. Using a metal spatula, spread a layer of cream cheese frosting evenly over the top of the cake. Take the next layer and place it on top, rounded-side up. Frost the top and sides of the cake with the remaining frosting. The cake should be refrigerated for about 1 hour to make sure the layers are set. Sprinkle chopped walnuts on top of cake, if desired. Butter Squash Cake
Procedures

1. In a large mixing bowl, beat eggs; gradually beat in sugar. Add squash and mix well. Combine the flour, baking soda and cinnamon; add to squash mixture and mix well. 2. Line a 15 x 10 x 1 inch baking pan with waxed paper; grease and flour the paper. Spread batter evenly into pan. Sprinkle with walnuts. Bake at 375 for 13-15 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack for 10 minutes 3. Turn cake onto a kitchen towel dusted with confectioners’ sugar. Gently peel off waxed paper. Roll up cake in the towel, jelly-roll style, starting with a short side. Cool completely on wire rack. 4. In a small mixing bowl, beat cream cheese, butter, confectioners’ sugar and vanilla until smooth. Unroll cake; spread filling evenly over cake within 1 inch of edges. Roll up again. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Just before serving, dust with confectioners’ sugar if desired

Procedures
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
2. Butter and flour a 9-inch round and 3-inch deep cake pan. Line the bottom with parchment paper. Set aside. 3. Put the carrots into a large mixing bowl and set aside.
4. Put the flour, baking powder, baking soda, spices, and salt in the bowl of a food processor and process for 5 seconds. Add this mixture to the carrots and toss until they are well-coated with the flour. 5. In the bowl of the food processor combine the sugar, brown sugar, eggs, and yogurt. 6. With the processor still running drizzle in the vegetable oil. Pour this mixture into the carrot mixture and stir until just combined. Pour into the prepared cake pan and bake on the middle rack of the oven for 45 minutes. Reduce the heat to 325 degrees F and bake for another 20 minutes or until the cake reaches 205 to 210 degrees F in the center.

President
A company president generally works with mid to senior level managers to devise a strategic plan that will generate revenues, create new opportunities for business and help the company to remain competitive in the market place. Strong emphasis on cost management is a critical component to a company he or she represents. Vice – President

Vice-president of the company takes part in directing overall business and corporation operations. The vice-president also heads programs within the company for growth, to promote and generate business. At times, depending on the size of the company the vice president handles a specific department. Board of Directors

The primary responsibility of the board of directors is to protect the shareholders assets and ensure they receive a decent return on their investment. The board of directors is the highest governing authority within the management structure at any publicly traded company. It is the boards job to select, evaluate, and approve appropriate compensation for the company’s chief executive officer, evaluate the attractiveness and pay dividend, recommend stock splits, oversee share repurchase programs, approve the company’s financial statements, and recommend or strongly discourage acquisitions and mergers. Marketing Department

The marketing department must act as a guide and lead the company’s other departments in developing, producing, fulfilling, and servicing products or services for their customers. Communication is vital. The marketing department typically has a better understanding of the market and customer needs, but should not act independently of product in development or customer service. Marketing should be involved, and there should be a meeting of the minds, whenever discussions are held regarding new product development o0r any costumer related function of the company. Financial Department

The finance department of a firm has abroad range of roles to undertake inside and outside its business and came large responsibilities especially in fields such as “Shareholder Value” which is increasingly gaining in importance. Finance department are important for the smooth operation of the business. The most common function of the finance department comprises the documentation and the controlling of incoming and outcoming cash flows as well as the actual handling of the cash flows.

Production Department
The production department is the functional area and is responsible for turning inputs into finished outputs through a series of production processes. The production processes are the various stages of production that turn raw materials into finished goods. Although businesses such as bank, insurance companies and internet service providers do not supply physical goods that can be seen or held, they do have to organize their resources to meet customers’ demands as completely as possible. Human Resources Department

The people who make up a company’s workforce – its human resources mare considered to be an asset to the company, just like its financial resources and material resources, such as buildings, machinery and other equipment. A company is more likely to be successful if it mangers its entire resources well, including its people. This is why many companies have human resources departments, even though those departments do not directly contribute to the company’s production services, sales or profits. Rather, effective HR departments allow and encourage the company’s employees to do their best, which in turn contributes to the success of those companies. Communication Department

This department plays a key role in how investors, employees and the general public perceive a company. They often report directly to a company’s chief executive officer and serve as advisers in managing a company’s reputation. They help leaders prepare for media interviews, develop messages to deliver to investors and employees and suggest new initiatives to keep companies on the cutting edge of communication with their stakeholders.

Author Exploration Paper: Saki

Born on December eighteenth, 1870, Hector Hugh Munro was the third child of Charles Augustus Munro, an inspector general in the Burma police. H.H. Munro’s mother, Mary Frances Mercer, was killed a mere two years after her youngest son was born. She was killed by a runaway cow in England (Merriman). After her death, H.H. Munro and his siblings were raised in England by their two aunts and grandmother. These three adults were often the inspiration for many female characters in Munro’s stories (“A biography of Saki”). Mrs. DeRopp, in “Srendi Vashtar”, is modelled after his aunt Agnes (“H.H. Munro: About the Author”). His aunts were both very strict, and they often used the birch and whip as a form of punishment. However, if Saki had not faced such harsh trials as a child, his future works might not have been as rich as they are today{Subjunctive mode}.

Due to the Munro children’s poor health, they were forced to be taught by governesses at home. At the age of twelve, H.H. Munro was finally able to attend school in Exmouth and Bedford Grammar. H.H. Munro’s father retired when Hector was sixteen. For a few years, the small family traveled the continent before his father arranged a post for him in the Burma police. Munro spent thirteen months in Burma. Although sick on multiple occasions, Munro was able to study Burmese animals, and he even raised a tiger cub during his time there(A Biography of Saki”). In 1984, Munro was forced to return to England after contracting malaria while in Burma.In 1896, Munro begn to write political satires for the Westminster Gazette. These essays were later collected and published as The Westminster Alice.

In 1902, Munro published a collection of his short stories, called Not-So Stories. Munro also published only one work of serious non-fiction called The Rise of the Russian Empire. This was the only piece ever written by Munro to contain his real name on the book jacket. For all of Munro’s other pieces, however, Munro’s name was nowhere to be found. Instead, Munro chose to write under the pen name of “Saki”. The name Saki can mean one of two things, either Munro was referring to himself as a breed of monkey, or he saw himself as the cupbearer of Fitzgerald’s Rubaiyat. It is more probable that the latter option is true, for Saki had often expressed his admiration for Fitzgerald’s work (Hitchens){Compound sentence}.

During his lifetime, Saki also served as a war correspondent before moving to Paris to write for The Morning Post and a French paper. He briefly revisited England in 1907 when his father became ill and died in May. Saki then opened a club, The Cocoa Tree, and continued to write for many newspapers and publish his short stories. When war was declared in late 1914, Saki enlisted in the army although he was officially too old{Complex Sentence}. He also surprised many of his admirers by turning down several commissions and insisting that he serve in the trenches, claiming that he couldn’t lead soldiers if he didn’t first know how to be one (Hitchens). He continued writing{gerund phrase} while in the army about his life on the front until November in 1916.

Near the village of Beaumont-Home on the river Somes, Saki was shot by a German sniper. On the verge of a crater, the great storyteller shouted, “Put that bloody cigarette out!” Those were to be the “great Saki’s” last words (Hitchens). Although Saki’s hand would write no more, it is quite clear that Saki’s writing has definitely been influenced by his life events. H.H. Munro, or Saki, lived and wrote during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This time period was speckled with various wars and revolutions, and gave birth to the world’s first great war. Throughout these major events, Saki was there to witness, record, and eventually give his life to these skirmishes.

During his life, Saki traveled to the Balkans, Russia, Poland, and France as a foreign correspondent from 1902 to 1908. While in these countries, he witnessed “Bloody Sunday” in St.Petersburg and the Russian Revolution of 1905. He also criticized the government for its “inept handling” of the Boer War (Silet). Saki’s many travels allowed him to be exposed to hardships and dangers that “…did much to alter the tone of his work” (Silet). Saki’s travels to Europe also “…introduced him to European Folk Literature” (Silet), a genre that supplied him with both subject matter and the darker vision of many of his later fiction.

When not traveling the world, Saki was often found in England, where he made observations about the Edwardian society that he lived in. He later transformed these observations into many short stories, based on the upsetting of the monotonous routine of everyday life (Silet). However, towards the end of his life, Saki’s work is darker; there seems to be less humor in his writing as time goes on (Silet).

During this period of his life, a hint of naturalism begins to creep into his writing, nearly extinguishing the flickering tongue of humor that used to be evident in all of his work. Saki’s use of naturalism is very apparent in his later fiction, such as the short stories “Dogged” and “The remoulding of Groby Lingfoughn”(Elahipanah). Although Saki wrote many different stories, sometimes using multiple genres, there is no question that the many world events that occurred during Saki’s lifetime greatly influenced Saki’s writing. Saki has often been called a “master of the short story”(Hitchens). Aside from this title, Saki was also a master of satire. Satire is generally witty and ironic, and uses carefully hidden hints in the text to convey its message.

The genre rarely attacks specific individuals, and often uses extremes to bring the audience to an awareness of the danger in a particular society (“Characteristics of Satire”). More specifically, Saki was an Edwardian satirist–he often made fun of his society, and many of his short stories have to deal with extraordinarily strange events happening to the ordinary people of his social class and time period (“H.H. Munro: About the Author”). Saki’s earlier stories are typically more humorous; his later stories are darker and more macabre due to his many experiences with war and the darker sides of humanity (Silet). Naturalism, a genre that shows the harsher side of life and portrays the idea that man is powerless against nature{appositive phrase}, is also apparent in some of Saki’s aforementioned later fiction. Many figures from Saki’s childhood (mainly his aunts Agatha and Charlotte) are also used as models for many of Saki’s female characters (Silet).

The characteristics of satire and and naturalism are both clearly portrayed through Saki’s writing. Saki’s short story “On Approval” includes many of the classic characteristics of satire that are also found in Saki’s other works. Having lived in England for much of his life, Saki knew the the city well, and chose London, a city he often frequented, as the setting for this story (“A Biography of Saki”). Gebhard Knopfschrank, a self-pronounced artist, moves to London from his small farm to try his success at painting. As time goes on, Knopfschrank becomes more and more poor, rarely purchasing meals. However, one day, Knopfschrank enters his boarding house and gleefully buys “…an elaborate meal that scarcely stopped short of being a banquet.” (“On Approval”).

The other boarders, believing that Knopfschrank has finally sold his his art and been discovered as a genius, rush to purchase Knopfschrank’s ridiculously expensive paintings, eager to buy his work{infinitive phrase} before their prices increase with his fame. Later, the boarders realize that Knopfschrank has not sold a single painting at all. In fact, a wealthy American has accidentally hit, and killed, many animals back on Knopfschrank’s farm. The American hastily paid “‘…perhaps more than they were worth, many times more than they would have fetched in the market after a month of fattening, but he was in a hurry to get on to Dantzig.’” (“On Approval”). Saki’s use of satire in this piece is evident. At the end of the story, Saki, through Knopfschrank’s character, ridicules Americans and how they constantly rush around using money to get out of their problems, saying, “‘…God be thanked for rich Americans, who are always in a hurry to get somewhere else” (“On Approval”).

This general attack on a specific group of people is an element commonly used in satire (“Characteristics of Satire”). This story also uses satire in another way–it is very ironic. Irony is almost always found in satire “(Characteristics of Satire”). On the last night of his stay, Knopfschrank sells many of his works, noting “Till to- day I have sold not one of my sketches. To-night you have bought a few, because I am going away from you” (“On Approval”). This is an example of situational irony. Satire is also evident yet another way in this piece–Saki writes the story in such a way that he makes the members of the boarding house’s unfortunate mistake seem more humorous than tragic, which is a key point of satire (“Characteristics of Satire”). Saki also states in the text that Knopfschrank “…fancied he could paint and was pardonably anxious to escape from the monotony of rye bread diet and the sandy, swine-bestrewn plains of Pomerania” (“On Approval”).

This quote portrays a common theme that often appears in many of Saki’s writings–the upsetting of everyday routines. The use of Saki’s genre satire and his personal connections to the setting of the story are evident Saki’s “On Approval”. Saki’s short story “The Interlopers” has clearly been influenced by Saki’s own life and genre. This tale, which takes place in a small strip of disputed forest, is about two enemies–Ulrich von Gradwitz and Georg Znaeym–who are both out late on a stormy night, patrolling their borders with their huntsmen, each trying to catch and kill the other. After wandering for some time, the men come face to face with each other. Before either can react, however, there was a “…splitting crash over their heads” (“The Interlopers”) and a towering tree {participial phrase[present]} falls and pins both men to the ground.

The two talk for a time, at first trading insults, but their exchanges soon become much kinder as the men begin to offer each other their friendship. By the end of the story, the former enemies have now become friends, and they see dark figures rushing towards them. Believing these figures to be their men, coming to rescue them, the two feel that all of their troubles are over, before coming to the startling realization that the forms, presumed to be their saviors, are actually the things that will be their deaths–wolves. The story ends with Ulrich letting out “…the idiotic chattering of a man unstrung with fear.” (“The Interlopers”).

This story contains many examples of irony, which is both a staple of satire (“Characteristics of Satire”) and a common element in many of Saki’s other stories. Dramatic irony is shown in the middle of the story, when the two enemies, fighting over a piece of land, are eventually killed by that land. Irony is portrayed in the story yet again by having the two former enemies end a century-long family feud mere moments before their own death. Saki even states in the text that “…if there was a man in the world whom [Gradwitz] detested and wished ill to it was Georg Znaeym” (“The Interlopers”). This story also connects to Saki’s personal life through the story’s setting. This story takes place in a forest located “…somewhere on the eastern spurs of the Carpathians” (“The Interlopers”), an area that Saki visited while traveling with his family (Merriaman). Saki’s “The Interlopers” includes aspects of Saki’s life, genre, and environment in its telling.

Many different facets of Saki’s life and his satire can be found in his short story “The Lumber-Room”. In this story, a young boy, Nicholas, is banned from the garden and forced to stay at home with his unpleasant aunt as punishment while his cousins are taken to the seaside for a vacation. While at home, Nicholas manages to pull off a great trick on his aunt; he compels her to believe that he is in the forbidden garden while Nicholas steals the key to the mysterious lumber-room. Once inside the mysterious room, Nicholas explores the room, discovering dozens of prizes. While in this room, Nicholas hears his aunt calling and hastily runs to her, only to discover that she has fallen into the water tank in the forbidden garden and is trapped inside, calling for help. Nicholas then explains to his aunt, whom he believes to be “…the Evil One” (“The Lumber-Room”), that he cannot help her because, due to rules laid out by her, he is not allowed to enter the garden.

Nicholas leaves the aunt in the water tank until a maid discovers her. Meanwhile, the other aunt and the children return from their visit, which turned out to be disastrous. While sitting at dinner, Nicholas reflects on the tapestry that he saw, and speculates that the huntsman may still escape from the wolves with his hounds. This story displays many different aspects of Saki’s own childhood. Saki himself was actually raised by his two aunts.

Saki, like Nicholas, also despised two aunts, and often based many of his female characters off of them (Hitchens). Saki was a practical joker (“A Biography of Saki”), quite similar to Nicholas in the story. Saki was also very fond of animals during his lifetime (“H.H. Munro: About the Author”), and displays this love of animals in “The Lumber-Room” by scattering many of them throughout the story. Nicholas finds some of these animals in the lumber room; there are many animal-themed items, and Nicholas soon discovers brass figures shaped in the images of “…hump-necked bulls, and peacocks and goblins” (“The Lumber-Room”).

There is also a beautiful book depicting colorful birds. Saki shows his love of animals by placing them in this “…storehouse of unimagined treasures” (“The Lumber-Room”). Saki uses irony, an important element of satire, in this story as well. When Nicholas’s aunt is trapped in the water tank and needs Nicholas to save her, Nicholas is unable to because she dictated earlier that he was “…not to go into the gooseberry garden” (“The Lumber-Room”). Saki uses both satire and his own life experiences to give this story true life and color.

The events of Saki’s life are heavily apparent in his short story “Sredni Vashtar”. In this story, Conradin, a young boy{appositive phrase}, is forced by his sickness to stay with his despised cousin, Mrs. DeRopp. One day, however, Conradin is able to smuggle an internecine ferret into the shed by his room. Conradin names this ferret Sredni Vashtar and creates a religion around this feral god. His aunt soon grows suspicious as Conradin begins to spend all of his time in the shed, showing fervid devotion to the gracile ferret. As time goes on, Conradin grows more and more obsessed with the ferret, and begins to chant “‘Do one thing for me, Sredni Vashtar.’” (“Sredni Vashtar”). Finally, his aunt goes to investigate the shed, puzzled as to why Conradin finds it so interesting. During her visit to the shed, a scream is heard coming from it. Moments later, a sleek shadow darts off into the night, its maw red and dark with Mrs. DeRopp’s blood. This story reflects Saki’s own childhood in many ways.

Saki, like Conradin, was weak when he was young, and was not deemed healthy enough to attend school until the age of twelve (Hitchens). Conradin also feels that “…without his imagination” (Sredni Vashtar”) he would not have been able to live due to”…drawn-out dullness” (“Sredni Vashtar). Saki writes that he sometimes felt the same way (Silet). Saki, like Conradin, was also confined to the care of an overbearing relative whom he greatly disliked–his aunt, Agatha (Silet). In “Sredni Vashtar, Conradin hates Mrs. DeRopp with “…a desperate sincerity which he was perfectly able to mask.” (“Sredni Vashtar”). Saki most likely felt this same way towards his own aunts. Mrs. DeRopp is actually based off of Saki’s despised aunt (Silet).

Clearly, many references to Saki’s early childhood are made in Saki’s “Sredni Vashtar”. Saki’s short stories, which are often about extraordinary things happening to extra-ordinary people, are as applicable in today’s world as they were during Saki’s own lifetime. Many of Saki’s works utilize the key aspects of both satire and naturalism, perfectly. Saki uses ironic wit and exaggerated scenarios to enthrall the reader in his works. This same method is often found in political cartoons today. Saki has also used his considerable talents to influence other authors, such as P.G. Wodehouse. One well-known actor (Hitchens) that was heavily impressed by Saki’s work was the late Noël Coward (Hitchens). While staying at a county house, Coward discovered a copy of Beasts and Super Beasts (a collection of Saki’s short stories) and was captivated by the author’s work (Hitchens). “‘I took it up to my bedroom, opened it casually, and was unable to go to sleep until I had finished it’” (Hitchens).

When referring to his own writing, Saki often called it ‘“true enough to be interesting but not true enough to be tiresome’” (Hitchens). This view of Saki’s prose is quite clear–although his work mainly focuses on the people of Saki’s day, the tremendous events that occur to them keep Saki’s work interesting and engaging. There is no doubt that Saki was able to create imaginative works that captivate the reader, beautiful short stories that are incredibly detailed, and unique texts that are unlike any other author’s{Parallel construction}. This makes Saki’s stories interesting and fun to read.Saki’s work has definitely been influenced by his personal experiences, his environment, and the genre of satire. Saki’s ironic short stories reveal to his readers his personal view on the disturbance of daily routine, events
that still occur quite often today.

My Father Goes to Court Author by Carlos Bulosan

My Father Goes to Court is just one of the many short stories in Carlos Bulosan’s “The Laughter of My Father” which was published in the 1940’s in the United States. It is the most popular one, I believe. He wrote this story based from folklore in the Philippines and it has an underlying social commentary. It was said that this work is a protest against the economic progress of his time. This story shows the culture, traits and way of the Filipinos.

In the Filipino context, this story favors the underprivileged families over affluent ones. It is supported by the part at the end of the story where after the father gave back the “spirit of wealth” through the jingling of the coins in the straw hat, the judge immediately dismissed the case. While it is not really true in this day and age because the poor has no fair fight against the rich, the idea behind it is not quite simple. Maybe the author wanted to show the issue the other way around, thus, using a reverse psychology.

Filipinos are known to be light people. We don’t usually wear much burden on our shoulders. Well, we have a lot but how do we cope with every situation? By not taking it so hard, of course! In every problem, like poverty, even if they don’t get to eat much for the day, they are still smiling and laughing together and the family is still intact. Like in the story, the narrator’s family is a poor family, and yet, because they are not so sensitive, they get to play outside and laugh. In the rich family’s case, they are abundant in food and a comfortable lifestyle but are still not content with what they have and push others-like the poor family- to pay for it. In the real world, rich people tend to step down on the poor because they perceive themselves more powerful than the poor.

In the part where the judge asked the father where his lawyer was, and he said he doesn’t need one, it is seen as the turning point of justice in the Philippines. The law dictates that every citizen is given justice. But is it really the case? The law takes for granted the poor. Yes, the poor can’t afford hiring the best lawyers so the rich takes advantage of them. In the story’s case, the judge didn’t care to give him a lawyer where in the real world, if you have no lawyer, it is as good as loosing.

Identify the three ways the author uses evidence to support assertions

Part 1-First Article
> Identify the three ways the author uses evidence to support assertions. > Identify the places where evidence is employed as well as how the author uses this evidence. Discuss evidence “as the reason” vs. “the support for the reason.” Also discuss evidence as dependent on the issue/context. > Analyzed how the author signals this usage through elements such as word choices, transitions, or logical connections. Article 1 predictive probes by Jerry E. Bishop, talked about Nancy Wexler’s mother died of a disease called Huntington’s disease. Huntington’s disease is a well known hereditary and always fatal affliction that strikes in midlife. Ms. Wexler, 38 year old, president of the Hereditary Disease Foundation in Santa Monica, California. Ms. Wexler lived with uncertainty of whether she has Huntington’s disease or not.

Scientist said that they were on the verge of coming with a new test to detect Huntington’s disease. But Ms. Wexler was deciding whether to take the test or not. Ms. Wexler was terrified that the results could be bad. She felt that if she finds out that she indeed inherit the disease, she will not know how to survive knowing that someday she will die. Test reveals that some has the disease, should be ready a year or so. Researchers discovered that some genes can lead to premature. They also hope to spot those that could predispose anyone to breast or colon cancer.

After reading the article twice, the author used dependent context/issue. The reason of using dependent context/issue, because all topics Jerry E. Bishop was talking about makes a supplication to evidence the course of the argument, but the kind of evidence that is available. The author made the woman felt as if she inherits the Huntington’s disease from her mother. Ms. Wexler also said that taking the test would be terrific for her to see if she did inherit the disease.

The author signals this usage through elements as logical connection. Because the author did a very unbroken reason to take the test that the scientist has come up with finding the fatal ailment known as Huntington’s disease.

Part 2-Second Article
> Identify the author’s use of the three elements: experiment, correlation, and speculation to support assertions. >Analyze how the author signals the use of these elements through language. For example, word
choices, transitions, or logical connections.

Of Mice and Men: How does the author show sympathy for Curley’s wife

On the ranch there is a well known woman merely referred to as ‘Curley’s Wife’. As the characters develop we find that she is not in fact the unimportant, nameless character we first perceive her as, but rather she is a relatively complex one, with much more to her than we first gather, causing us to feel sympathy for her later in the novel. In this essay I will state how John Steinbeck influenced the reader to feel sympathy for Curley’s wife, especially after making the reader prejudice towards her.

Steinbeck creates sympathy for Curley’s wife in numerous ways, one being her name. The fact that she never has a name outside of the reference to her husband clearly shows the reader that her identity is surrendered to a heartless husband. Evidence of this is when she admits that her husband ‘aint a nice man’ and that she never truly wanted to marry him. This leaves the reader with a impression of a unhappy, isolated woman to the extent that there is sympathy regardless of her outrageous behavior towards Crooks. Alternatively, the lack of a name for this woman could could suggest she is insignificant and not as important of a character as George, Lennie or any of the other men on the ranch. It could also be referring to how during the Great Depression, women were oppressed and treated less equally. Steinbeck may have portrayed Curley’s wife in this light to allow the reader to recognize the inferior role of women at that time. The lack of name relegates Curley’s wife to an insignificant status like a lot of women in a 1930s society.

Steinbeck enables the reader to see Curley’s Wife through migrant worker Candy’s eyes on their first encounter her, as in his dialogue he refers to her as a ‘tart’. Through his words, we develop an initial perception of Curley’s Wife as as a bit of a ‘floozie’. Furthermore, Candy effectively accuses her of acting disloyal to her newly married husband Curley by saying, ‘she got the eye’ for other men. The word ‘tart’ suggests she presents herself in an ostentatious manner. Before even being introduced to the woman, the reader is convinced she’s to blame for anything that goes wrong in Solidad. Her physical appearance of ‘…full, rouged lips…’, as well as ‘fingernail painted red’ and elaborate hair, emphasize our preconceptions of her.

I believe her attire is very significant to how we perceive her. She is said to be ‘heavily made up’ in primary colours (making her almost impossible to ignore or dismiss). This could be interpreted as her silent cry out for attention due to her being so isolated and lonely, after all there are no other woman on the ranch. Her appearance is portrayed as one of an actress or someone who has means of great luxury, this is why she is so incongruous on the ranch as she is not your typical housewife.. Her mien could also be construed as though she believes she is above any other woman who lives on a ranch, indicating she wants escape from her current lifestyle as her attire is suited for anything but her own. The description of her face being, ‘heavily made up’ could also propose the idea that she is insecure with her natural complexion. In other words, her face is a mask – it’s fake and not the real her. This makes a big connection of her ambitions of being an actress, a person that is constantly pretending to be someone they’re not. All of this contributes to the reader sympathising with her as she is so hopelessly insecure.

On the other hand, Curley’s Wife’s appearance could be seen as naivety, and simply desire to be appreciated/noticed. Steinbeck may have portrayed Curley’s Wife with’ wide eyes’ to illustrate her as gullible or even that she is searching for something – which I believe was to be appreciated. If the text is analysed thoroughly, Steinbeck leaves subtle traces of evidence to help the reader understand her behaviour and fashionistic choices. ‘He says he was gonna put me in the movies’ is evidence of the ‘dream life’ Curley’s wife believed she was destined to have as she details twice ‘ I coulda been in movies… I coulda sat in big hotels’ had her chance not have been stolen. This theme of lost opportunity or shattered dreams is often repeated throughout the story. The delusional mindset that leads to her cruel nature is the theme that makes the reader sympathetic to her.

Red is a primary colour therefore people are attracted to it hence why Curley’s Wife wearing a lot of red may symbolise she desperately wants the spotlight (attention) – much like many film stars. The description of ‘full rouged lips’ could be evidence of her attempt to be appreciated by the ranch workers; by drawing their attention to her lips it forces them to listen to what she has to say. Furthermore, another connotation of the colour is danger. A reason for Steinbeck portraying her as an associate of this colour may have been the foreshadowing of the blood that was to be shed.

Finally, it is also a reminder of the girl in Weed who had a ‘red velvet’ dress that Lennie grabbed which caused him and George to go on the run, which we also know happens at the end of this novel. I believe Steinbeck structures Curley’s Wife’s character very intelligently as this subtle foreshadow indirectly makes a connection of the beginning and ending of the novel, also relating to her ambitions of being a movie star by the emphasis of a red ‘velvet’ dress. This indistinct description is often unnoticed causing the ‘reality vs: fantasy’ connection to be dismissed between Curley’s wife wearing a ‘cotton’ dress which immediately makes her no more than a housewife, however much she tries.

Also on Curley’s Wife’s first appearance, the reader is made apparent of her alleged promiscuity as, ‘she put her hands behind her back and leaned against the door frame so that her body was thrown forward’, This suggestive and provocative body language justifies Candy’s statement of her and is hard evidence to the reader that she in fact a tart. However, we know this is not true. Curley’s wife shows similar traits to Crooks by standing in the door frame as he is isolated from it too. This causes the reader to feel sympathetic for her as she is secluded for being conceived as something she actually isn’t. Through no fault of her own, the men do not want to associate with her due them believing she is ‘jailbate’ ‘and a ‘rattrap’.

This infers that the men are scared of her, something that frustrates her because she can’t comprehend why the men’s attitudes to her are so negative. The ‘rattrap’ could also be a forewarning of her escape to freedom which was only achievable by death. This is because once the rat trap’ (ie her) had been set off, it could no longer be used again, so effectively she committed suicide. I think that Curley’s wife and a rat are arguably similar as they are both hated by their relative society for being who / what they are, which is completely unfair. Also, rats are relatively small animals, this could link to Curley’s wife as she feels and is perceived as dramatically insignificant on the Boss’ ranch.

Curleys’ wife both talks and acts playfully and flirtatiously in front of the other workers. In my opinion she behaves in this manner because her sex is her only weapon to gain attention. Steinbeck could have been trying to make a point of her actions being relative to the era she lived in. I believe he deliberately portrayed her in this light with the intentions of making the reader feel sympathetic towards her in later chapters, but also to make the reader feel apologetic and penitent for labeling and being prejudice towards her.

On one of her ‘looking for Curley’ routines she says, ‘They left all the weak ones here’ alluding to the three men, all ‘weak’ in their respective ways. However there is irony in this comment because she is seen as unworthy of a name thus why the reader can conclude that she’s unimportant. It is also ironic because she was left behind by all the men too, ‘Even Curley’. This causes the reader to feel sympathy for her as she is aware that she is just as marginalized as the ‘weak’ men. Evidence of this is when she rhetorically questions them.

Here, the author is not only trying to show that Curley is a major obstacle in her having a proper conversation but Steinbeck is also emphasizing the fragmented relationship the couple have.The lonely and hostile side of the woman is revealed when she admits to feeling a shameless dissatisfaction with her life which inevitably causes the reader to feel remorse for her. Curley’s wife is again shown to be dislikeable by expressing bitterness when reffering to the men as ‘bindle stiffs- a nigger an’ a dum dum” The author presents her intense anger by stating “breathless with indignation” which explains her frustration.

Finally, Steineck creates sympathy for Curley’s wife in the way that he portrayed her death as her true vulnerability is unmasked. ‘Ever’one knowed you’d mess things up.’ were the words from Candy when left in the barn with her body. The fact that none of the ranch workers, or even her husband, seemed to be particularly saddened of her death causes the reader to feel sympathy for her because it cements just how unappreciated she was. We finally see her for the young victim she is as ‘the meanness and the plannings and the discontent and the ache were all gone from her face’. This repetition of discontent symbolizes that death was her escape because she is now away from being negatively labelled and misinterpreted.

Steinbeck uses imagery to present her at peace after her death as she is described as, ‘…very pretty…sweet and young…’ This causes the reader to feel sympathetic as the character we first perceived her as is gone. Also, the description of ‘young’ furthered my sympathy towards her as it suggests to me she had a short and unfulfilled life. My sympathy for her is also heightened in this chapter because her vulnerability is now clearly identifiable, for example she failed to understand the danger of Lennie – despite the evidence of his violent power in her husband’s mutilated hand and the dead pup he is grasping. The basic idea in Steinbeck’s description of Curley’s wife’s corpse is that in death her beauty can finally be appreciated. Furthermore, who can’t feel sympathy for somebody that is dead from no fault of their own?

Personally, I feel most sympathetic towards Curley’s wife more than any other character in the book because she was in a constant battle to be accepted. What makes me most sympathetic though is that in finally letting her guard down to confide in Lennie, she was murdered. Even in her death she is nothing more than a scapegoat as she is referred to as ‘no good’ by Candy. She was never considered as a person, only as Curley’s showcase trophy. Curley’s wife, as Steinbeck depicts her, does not share Lennie’s innocence. Steinbeck rests a measure of blame for the killing on the victim herself which causes the reader to yet again pity her unfortunate life.

Moreover, I feel sympathetic towards her because her dreams were futile and it was only at death that she could be rid of all the male dominance that corrupted and controlled her life. After all, it was a man who gave her the ‘false hopes entity’ that followed her to her life on the ranch, and no matter how hard she tried, she couldn’t leave the past behind. She ‘had the eye’ restlessly searching for true love and affection. Steinbeck gave Curley’s wife a circular structure that represents no matter how hard she tried to progress to her ambitions, her cycle always involved her finishing at her starting point, therefore no progress could ever made because her life was the ‘beginning of the end’.