Latest news

  • in

    An Analysis of Jonathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal”

    Satire as a form of discursive follow could additionally be correctly understood if it is contextualized within a selected tradition, establishment, attitude, or perception. It is only by placing the satire within a specific setting [as introduced by the weather talked about above] that a satire will garner the “non-linguistic parts covering the preparatory preconditions […] More

  • in

    Jonathan Swift”s satire “A Modest Proposal…”

    In the depths of disparity and desperation, some will resort to unimaginable measures so as to find solutions. Novelist Jonathan Swift wrote the satire, “A Modest Proposal For Preventing The Children Of Poor People In Ireland, From Being A Burden On Their Parents Or Country, And For Making Them Beneficial To The Publick” (1729) which […] More

  • in

    “The Human Cost of an Illiterate Society” by Jonathan Kozol

    Reading essay The Human Cost of an Illiterate Society by Jonathan Kozol rekindles the candle of the horrors of illiteracy within us, a candle that has been extinguished by our hectic lives. As he quotes James Madison’s statement, “A people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power knowledge gives”, […] More

  • in

    Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards uses an effective method called the “fire and brimstone” approach, which basically used scare tactics to keep people from straying away from the church. Jonathan Edwards was a master at using literary devices, which horrified but intrigued his audience. He (Edwards) wrote in second person to make each individual feel responsible for their […] More

  • in

    Jonathan Livingston Seagull

    Like Starsky and Hutch, Jaws and flared jeans, Jonathan Livingston Seagull was one of the hits of the 1970s. It was even made into a movie. But what exactly is this book, and is it still worth reading? Bach’s bestseller is an uplifting fable of a seagull, Jonathan, who decides he is much more than […] More